Current Maps

Fire Weather Maps

Current Fire Weather Conditions learn more

Current Fire Weather Conditions

The Current Fire Weather Conditions map displays the values of some of the most important variables to wildland fire behavior: relative humidity, wind, and temperature. Mesonet stations are represented by solid dots on the map. The following variables are displayed:
  • Air Temperature at 30 ft (9 m) in degrees F (upper left of station dot in red)
  • Relative Humidity at 5 ft (1.5 m) in % (lower left of station dot in green)
  • Average Wind at 33 ft (10 m) in mph -- A wind barb system is used. A half barb along the staff represents 5 mph; a full barb, 10 mph; and a flag, 50 mph. One adds them up to get the total average wind speed. Winds blow in a direction along the staff from the barbed end to the station dot. Calm winds are depicted by an open circle around the station dot.
  • Wind Gusts at 33 ft (10 m) in mph (upper right of station dot in purple). Wind gusts are only shown for gusts >= 20 mph; they are depicted by "Gnn", where nn is the wind gust speed.
This map is updated every 5 minutes.
Relative Humidity and Winds learn more

Relative Humidity and Winds

The Relative Humidity and Winds map displays the current relative humidity at 1.5 m (5 ft), displayed in percent (%), at each Mesonet site, as well as the 10-m average wind conditions across Oklahoma. Relative humidity (RH) indicates the percentage of water vapor that the air is currently holding (with respect to its maximum holding capacity at the current temperature). RH is the most critical weather variable for fire behavior, as a lower relative humidity leads to lower dead fuel moisture, especially in the 1-hour and 10-hour fuels. The 10-m (33 ft) winds are represented by wind vectors (arrows) whose lengths are proportional to the wind speed and which point in the direction toward which the wind is blowing. This map is updated every 5 minutes.
1-hr Relative Humidity Change learn more

1-hr Relative Humidity Change

The 1-hour Relative Humidity Change map plots the change in relative humidity (%) at each Mesonet station over the past hour, information useful for showing recent RH trends so important to wildland fire behavior. This map is updated every 5 minutes.
3-hr Relative Humidity Change learn more

3-hr Relative Humidity Change

The 3-hour Relative Humidity Change map plots the change in relative humidity (%) at each Mesonet station over the past 3 hours. This map is updated every 5 minutes.
Today's Maximum Relative Humidity learn more

Today's Maximum Relative Humidity

This map depicts the maximum relative humidity (%) occurring since midnight. This information is useful to see if fuel recovery for 1- and 10-hour dead fuels has had a chance to occur in the overnight hours before sunrise. This map is updated every 5 minutes.
Wind Speed and Direction learn more

Wind Speed and Direction

The Wind Speed and Direction map displays the average wind speeds (in miles per hour) at 10 m (33 feet) across Oklahoma as well as the wind directions. Wind directions are represented by wind vectors (arrows) whose lengths are proportional to the wind speed and which point in the direction toward which the wind is blowing. This map is updated every 5 minutes.
Wind Gusts learn more

Wind Gusts

The Wind Gusts map displays the highest 10-m (33 ft) wind gust (in mph) recorded at each Mesonet station in the past five minutes. This map is updated every 5 minutes.
2-meter Winds learn more

2-meter Winds

The 2-meter Winds map displays the average wind speeds (in mph) at 2 m (6.5 ft) above the surface. Wind directions at 10-m (33 ft) height are also shown and depicted by wind vectors (arrows) whose lengths are proportional to the wind speed and which point in the direction toward which the wind is blowing. This map is updated every 5 minutes.
Air Temperature learn more

Air Temperature

The Air Temperature map plots the current air temperature (degrees F) at the standard height of 1.5 m (5 feet). When temperatures are below freezing, a line will delineate the areas of the state that are above and below freezing. This map is updated every 5 minutes.
Dewpoint learn more

Dewpoint

The Dewpoint Temperature map displays the current dewpoint temperature (degrees F) observed at each Mesonet site. Dewpoint is the temperature to which air must be cooled for saturation to occur (given a constant pressure and water vapor content).
Wind Chill / Heat Index learn more

Wind Chill / Heat Index

This Wind Chill / Heat Index map plots either:
  1. Wind Chill (degrees F) if temperatures are below 50 F and winds are greater than 3 mph,
  2. Heat Index (degrees F) if temperatures are above 80 F, or
  3. Current Temperature (degrees F) if neither wind chill or heat index is a factor.
This map is updated every 5 minutes.
Dispersion Conditions and Winds learn more

Dispersion Conditions and Winds

The Dispersion Conditions and Winds map displays near-surface dispersion conditions as well as average winds at the 10-m (33 ft) level. There are six categories of dispersion conditions which are calculated by the Oklahoma Dispersion Model (ODM): Excellent (EX), Good (G), Moderately Good (MG), Moderately Poor (MP), Poor (P), and Very Poor (VP). The first three categories appear in various shades of green on the dispersion maps, while the last three range from beige to orange to red. A numbered system is also used to represent the six dispersion categories: 1=VP, 2=P, 3=MP, 4=MG, 5=G, and 6=EX. The ODM estimates near-surface dispersion, which is the ability of the atmosphere to dilute and disperse a compound such as smoke as it travels downwind. The calculated dispersion categories are valid for downwind distances of 1/4 mile to several miles. The categories can be interpreted as follows for a given downwind distance (e.g., 1 mile): the smoke concentration near the plume centerline will be greatest under VP conditions and the lowest under EX conditions. Thus, as a general guideline for prescribed burning, Moderately Good (MG) or better (G, EX) conditions should be present during the burn to avoid smoking out potential sensitive areas downwind. 10-m winds on this map are represented by wind vectors (arrows), whose lengths are proportional to the wind speed and which point in the direction toward which the wind is blowing. This map is updated every 5 minutes.
Inversion Conditions learn more

Inversion Conditions

The Inversion Conditions map is used to determine air temperature conditions within the 30-foot layer above the ground. In addition, dew point temperature and average wind (speed and direction) is shown. Mesonet stations are represented by solid dots on the map. The following variables are displayed:
  • Air Temperature at 30 ft (9 m) in degrees F (upper left of station dot)
  • Air Temperature at 5 ft (1.5 m) in degrees F (lower left of station dot)
  • Average Wind at 33 ft (10 m) in mph -- A wind barb system is used. A half barb along the staff represents 5 mph; a full barb, 10 mph; and a flag, 50 mph. One adds them up to get the total average wind speed. Winds blow in a direction along the staff from the barbed end to the station dot. Calm winds are depicted by an open circle around the station dot.
  • Dew Point Temperature at 5 ft (1.5 m) in degrees F (lower right of station dot in green)
  • Difference between the 30 ft and 5 ft Air Temperature in degrees F (upper right of station dot); red (> 0F) if there is an inversion, blue (<= 0F) if there is not an inversion.
During the daytime, air temperature usually decreases with height above the surface (no inversion). During nights with clear to mostly cloudy skies and light winds, air temperature usually increases with height above the surface (inversion conditions). This map is updated every 5 minutes.
Oklahoma Radar learn more

Oklahoma Radar

The Oklahoma Radar map is a composite of all radars in Oklahoma. When temperatures are below freezing, a line will delineate the areas of the state that are above and below freezing. The unit dBZ is a measure of the radar reflectivity factor, which indicates the intensity of the precipitation on the map. The higher the dBZ value, the more intense is the precipitation.
1-hr Rainfall Accumulation learn more

1-hr Rainfall Accumulation

The 1-hour Rainfall Accumulation map displays accumulated rainfall observed at each Mesonet site in the last hour. This map also displays the NWS River Forecast Center's rainfall estimates (in color) across Oklahoma based on radar. During precipitation events involving ice, hail, or snow, the rain gauges used by the Oklahoma Mesonet may freeze over and record no rainfall. Once air temperatures raise enough to allow thawing, accumulated frozen precipitation in the gauge will melt and be recorded.

24-hr Rainfall Accumulation learn more

24-hr Rainfall Accumulation

The 24-hour Rainfall Accumulation map displays accumulated rainfall observed at each Mesonet site in the last 24 hours. This map also displays the NWS River Forecast Center's rainfall estimates (in color) across Oklahoma based on radar. During precipitation events involving ice, hail, or snow, the rain gauges used by the Oklahoma Mesonet may freeze over and record no rainfall. Once air temperatures raise enough to allow thawing, accumulated frozen precipitation in the gauge will melt and be recorded.

Fire Danger Maps

Burning Index learn more

Burning Index

The Burning Index map displays the burning index (BI) value (10*feet) as calculated by the Oklahoma Fire Danger Model. This is probably the most useful index of the National Fire Danger Rating System (on which the Oklahoma Fire Danger Model is based) since BI directly relates to the intensity of the fire (and thus is related to the difficulty of containment) and is scaled such that BI/10 is equal to the flame length (FL) in feet at the head of the fire. It is an index which integrates both the spread component (SC) and energy release component (ERC). The traditional U.S. Forest Service interpretation of burning index with respect to fire behavior and suppression is listed below:
BI < 40 (FL < 4 ft): Fires can generally be attacked at the head or flanks by persons using hand tools. Hand line should hold the fire.
BI = 40-80 (FL = 4-8 ft): Fires are too intense for direct attack on the head by persons using hand tools. Hand line cannot be relied on to hold fire. Equipment such as dozers, pumpers, and retardant aircraft can be effective.
BI = 80-110 (FL = 8-11 ft): Fires may present serious control problems – torching out, crowning, and spotting. Control efforts at the fire head will probably be ineffective.
BI > 110 (FL > 11 ft): Crowning, spotting, and major fire runs are probable. Control efforts at the head of the fire are ineffective.
Burning index is a function of the fuel model being used, the live and dead fuel moistures, and the weather conditions. If the fuel types and loads are substantially different than those in the fuel model being used, there will be inaccuracies. Finally, it is important to realize that these indices produced by the National Fire Danger Rating system are for the conditions modeled at 1-km resolution. In other words, the fuel model represents conditions over the entire 1-km square area, so indices such as BI are not meant to be used on a field-by-field basis. As an example, if the particular fuel in the area of concern (e.g., a particular field) differs from the assigned fuel model in that 1-km square, then the Oklahoma Fire Danger Model results for that square can be expected to be different than for the particular field in question (e.g., an open grassy area in a 1-km square that has been assigned a forest fuel model). Other limitations of the model can be found in the document entitled The Oklahoma Fire Danger Model.
Spread Component learn more

Spread Component

The spread component (SC) is numerically equal to the theoretical forward speed of the headfire in feet/minute. It is the most variable of the fire danger indices, with variations being caused by changes in wind speed and in moisture content of the live and dead fuels. SC is another index produced by the Oklahoma Fire Danger Model. Wind speed, slope and fine fuel moisture are key inputs in the calculation of the spread component, thus accounting for a high variability from day-to-day. Spread component is a function of the fuel model being used, the live and dead fuel moistures, and the weather conditions. If the fuel types and loads are substantially different than those in the fuel model being used, there will be inaccuracies.
Energy Release Component learn more

Energy Release Component

The energy release component (ERC) is a measure of the available energy (BTU/square foot) released per unit area in the flaming zone at the head of the fire. It is the least variable of the indices on a day-to-day basis, being a function solely of the fuels (and their moisture content, which is weather-dependent). ERC is another index produced by the Oklahoma Fire Danger Model. Conditions producing an ERC value of 24 represent a potential heat release twice that of conditions resulting in an ERC value of 12. Since ERC represents the potential “heat release” per unit area in the flaming zone, it can provide guidance to several important fire activities. It may also be considered a composite fuel moisture value as it reflects the contribution that all live and dead fuels have to potential fire intensity. Especially for fuel complexes containing the heavier 100- and 1000-hour fuels, the ERC is a cumulative or “build-up” type of index. As live fuels cure and dead fuels dry, the ERC values get higher, thus providing a good reflection of drought conditions. ERC is a function of the fuel model being used, the live and dead fuel moistures, and the weather conditions. If the fuel types and loads are substantially different than those in the fuel model being used, there will be inaccuracies.
Ignition Component learn more

Ignition Component

The ignition component (IC) is equal to the probability (0-100%) of a firebrand producing a fire that will require suppression action. It says nothing about the intensity of the fire, which is indicated by the burning index (BI) value. IC is another fire danger index calculated by the Oklahoma Fire Danger Model. An IC of 100 means that every firebrand will cause a fire requiring suppression action if it contacts a receptive fuel. Likewise an IC of 0 would mean that no firebrand would cause a fire requiring suppression action under those conditions. Note the emphasis is on action. The key is whether a fire will result that requires a fire manager to make a decision. The ignition component is more than the probability of a fire starting; it has to have the potential to spread. Therefore spread component (SC) values are entered into the calculation of IC. If a fire will ignite and spread, some action or decision is needed. Ignition component is a function of the fuel model being used, the live and dead fuel moistures, and the weather conditions. If the fuel types and loads are substantially different than those in the fuel model being used, there will be inaccuracies.
1-hr Dead Fuel Moisture learn more

1-hr Dead Fuel Moisture

The 1-hr Dead Fuel Moisture map displays the % moisture content on a dry-weight basis of 1-hour dead fuels as calculated by a calibrated version of the Nelson dead fuel moisture model. Calculated values can range from 1% to 85%. One-hour fuels are the fine dead fuels (< 0.25”) such as grasses which are often involved in the initiation and maintenance of wildland fires and whose moisture contents respond quickly (within minutes) to changing weather conditions. These dead fuels include herbaceous plants, roundwood, and also the uppermost layer of litter on the forest floor. For prescribed fire, the preferred range of 1-hour dead fuel moisture is from 7 to 20%. Below 7%, spot fires become a problem and above 20% there will be problems in starting and maintaining the fire due to too much moisture in the fine fuels. To understand the influence of 1-hour dead fuel moisture on prescribed burning and wildfire, consult OK-FIRE Basics for Prescribed Burning and OK-FIRE Basics for Fire Danger.
10-hr Dead Fuel Moisture learn more

10-hr Dead Fuel Moisture

The 10-hr Dead Fuel Moisture map displays the % moisture content on a dry-weight basis of 10-hour dead fuels as calculated by a calibrated version of the Nelson dead fuel moisture model. Calculated values can range from 1% to 60%. Ten-hour fuels are the smaller diameter dead fuels in the 0.25" to 1" diameter range. They also respond quickly to changing weather conditions, but not as quickly as do 1-hour fuels. These fuels include roundwood and the layer of litter on forest floors extending, roughly, from 0.25" below the surface to 1" deep. For prescribed fire, the preferred range of 10-hour dead fuel moisture is from 7 to 20%. Below 7%, spot fires become a problem and above 20% there will be problems in maintaining the fire due to too much moisture in the 10-hour fuels. To understand the influence of 10-hour dead fuel moisture on prescribed burning and wildfire, consult OK-FIRE Basics for Prescribed Burning and OK-FIRE Basics for Fire Danger.
100-hr Dead Fuel Moisture learn more

100-hr Dead Fuel Moisture

The 100-hr Dead Fuel Moisture map displays the % moisture content on a dry-weight basis of 100-hour dead fuels as calculated by a calibrated version of the Nelson dead fuel moisture model. Calculated values can range from 1% to 40%. 100-hour fuels include roundwood with diameters of 1-3" as well as organic materials beneath the surface at roughly 1-4" depths. 100-hour fuels respond more slowly than 10-hour fuels to changing weather conditions and are better indicators for extended dry or wet periods. Low 100-hr dead fuel moisture during the growing season is often associated with increased summer wildfire activity. This map is updated every hour.
1000-hr Dead Fuel Moisture learn more

1000-hr Dead Fuel Moisture

The 1000-hr Dead Fuel Moisture map displays the % moisture content on a dry-weight basis of 1000-hour dead fuels as calculated by a calibrated version of the Nelson dead fuel moisture model. Calculated values can range from 1% to 32%. 1000-hour fuels include roundwood with diameters of 3-8" as well as organic materials beneath the surface at roughly 4-12" depths. 1000-hour fuels respond more slowly than 100-hour fuels to changing weather conditions and are excellent indicators of extended dry or wet periods. Low 1000-hr dead fuel moisture during the growing season is indicative of drought and usually associated with increased summer wildfire activity. This map is updated every hour.
Live Herbaceous Moisture learn more

Live Herbaceous Moisture

The Live Herbaceous Moisture map displays the % moisture content on a dry-weight basis of live herbaceous fuels (e.g., grasses, forbs, ferns). In contrast to dead fuels, live herbaceous fuels have some greenness showing and moisture content is controlled largely by physiological processes within the plant (e.g., green-up in the spring, senescence in the fall). Because live fuels consist mainly of water, fuel moisture values can go well over 100%. Low soil moisture can cause these fuels to decrease in fuel moisture and eventually convert to dead 1-hour fuels. Live herbaceous moisture is crudely modeled as a function of relative greenness for each 1-km square pixel of land and can range from 0-200%. This map is updated every Tuesday when the new weekly satellite data is processed.
Live Woody Moisture learn more

Live Woody Moisture

The Live Woody Moisture map displays the % moisture content on a dry-weight basis of live woody fuels. Woody fuels are divided into evergreen and deciduous, and refer to the leaves, needles, and twigs of woody shrubs and trees. In contrast to dead fuels, live woody fuels contain some greenness and moisture content is controlled largely by physiological processes within the plant. Deciduous live woody fuels go through an annual cycle, at the end of which the leaves and twigs become dead fuels for purposes of fire danger modeling. During the growing season, low soil moisture can cause these deciduous fuels to decrease in fuel moisture and can cause evergreen fuels to decrease in fuel moisture anytime throughout the year. Because live fuels consist mainly of water, fuel moisture values can go well over 100%. Live woody moisture is crudely modeled as a function of relative greenness for each 1-km square pixel of land and can range from 70-160%. This map is updated every Tuesday when the new weekly satellite data is processed.
16-inch % Plant Available Soil Moisture learn more

16-inch % Plant Available Soil Moisture

Plotted values depict the percent of maximum plant available soil moisture currently in the top 16" of the soil profile. In the growing season (May through October), values <= 20% are strongly associated with large wildfires (>= 1000 acres), given suitable fire weather conditions, because low soil moisture reduces fuel production and live fuel moisture, which increases wildfire risk. In contrast, in the dormant season (November through April), the link between large wildfires and plant available soil moisture is weaker because dead fuels predominate and, consequently, fire weather is the major driver for wildfires. Finally, elevated plant available soil moisture (> 50%) during the spring and early summer months results in increased fuel production and, consequently, increased probability of large fires in the subsequent dormant season given suitable fire weather. This map is updated every 30 minutes with the latest 24-hr averages; values may occasionally go above 100% or below 0% due to local soil site and weather conditions.
Keetch-Byram Drought Index (KBDI) learn more

Keetch-Byram Drought Index (KBDI)

The Keetch-Byram Drought Index (KBDI) is a drought index calculated by the Oklahoma Fire Danger Model. Ranging from 0 to 800, the index is used to increase the amount of dead fuel available to the fire. KBDI was included in the 1988 revisions to the National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) on which the Oklahoma Fire Danger Model is based. KBDI values at Mesonet sites are updated daily at 4 p.m. CST. Drought, as defined by KBDI, is a condition of dryness in the litter, duff, and upper soil layers that progresses from saturation to an absence of available moisture. The KBDI is based on an arbitrary 8 inches of water in the litter/duff/soil column. When the column is completely saturated, KBDI = 0. As water is removed from the column by evapotranspiration, the KBDI increases in value. When KBDI reaches 800 (its max), all the plant available water has been removed. In the NFDRS and Oklahoma Fire Danger Model, as KBDI increases above a value of 100, increasing amounts of dead fuel are provided for burning. During combustion some of this fuel contributes directly to fireline intensity (BI), but most increases total heat release (ERC) and contributes to burn severity through smoldering combustion. In Oklahoma, the KBDI has shown itself to be more useful during the growing season than during the dormant season. Also, as it was developed mainly for forested landscapes, its usefulness for grassy landscapes is somewhat questionable. KBDI values in the 600-800 range represent the most severe drought conditions, and many states issue burn bans at these levels. In forested areas, prescribed fires should not be conducted at values over 700, as fires will be intense and deep burning.
Visual Greenness learn more

Visual Greenness

Visual Greenness (VG) ranges from 0-100% and indicates how green each 1-km square pixel of land is in relation to a standard reference such as a highly green agricultural field. A given VG value represents the same level of greenness no matter where it occurs in the state. A value of 100% represents the highest greenness level and 0%, the lowest greenness level. VG is calculated from weekly composite satellite imagery (AVHRR) using NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and is updated on OK-FIRE every Tuesday. If a given pixel is cloudy during the entire weekly period, the VG value is not calculated and the pixel appears light blue on the VG map.
Relative Greenness learn more

Relative Greenness

Relative Greenness (RG) ranges from 0-100% and indicates how green each 1-km square pixel of land is in relation to a 16-year historical (1989-2004) database of greenness values for that particular pixel. An RG value of 100% signifies that this is the highest greenness level ever reached during the multi-year period, while an RG value of 0% indicates that this is the lowest greenness level reached over that same period. RG is calculated from weekly composite satellite imagery (AVHRR) using NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and is updated on OK-FIRE every Tuesday. If a given pixel is cloudy during the entire weekly period, the RG value used is taken from the last available valid value for that pixel. RG is a very important variable in the fire danger model used in OK-FIRE. It is used to model live fuel moisture (herbaceous and woody) and to apportion the fuel load distribution between 1-hour dead fuels and live herbaceous and live deciduous woody fuels.

Satellite Maps

Oklahoma Visible Satellite learn more

Oklahoma Visible Satellite

This statewide satellite map is a snapshot of what the satellite sees in the visible wavelengths at the time shown at the lower right of the image. During the daytime this map is useful for seeing clouds as well as features such as smoke plumes from wildfires. This map is typically updated every 15 minutes.
Oklahoma Water Vapor Satellite learn more

Oklahoma Water Vapor Satellite

This statewide satellite map depicts the water vapor concentration over the region at the time shown at the lower right of the image. With respect to fire danger, this map is useful for depicting areas of very low water vapor content (orange and red colors) which can sometimes translate to very low relative humidity at the surface, especially during the daytime with convective mixing, leading to high fire danger. This map is typically updated every 15 minutes.
Regional 3.9 micron Infrared Satellite learn more

Regional 3.9 micron Infrared Satellite

This regional satellite map depicts radiative emissions at a particular wavelength (3.9 microns) in the infrared spectrum that is very useful for detecting wildland fires (wildfires or prescribed fires). Fires appear as distinct gray to black areas (often dots) against the usual light gray background. Clouds are depicted in whites and will usually obscure any surface fires. The time of the image is shown in UTC time at the upper left of the image (CST = UTC - 6 hours; CDT = UTC - 5 hours) and the map is typically updated every 15 minutes.
Regional Visible Satellite learn more

Regional Visible Satellite

This regional satellite map is a snapshot of what the satellite sees in the visible wavelengths at the UTC time depicted at the upper left of the map (CST = UTC - 6 hours; CDT = UTC - 5 hours). During the daytime this map is useful for seeing clouds as well as features such as smoke plumes from wildfires. This map is typically updated every 15 minutes.
Regional Water Vapor Satellite learn more

Regional Water Vapor Satellite

This regional satellite map depicts the water vapor concentration over the region at the UTC time depicted at the upper left of the map (CST = UTC - 6 hours; CDT = UTC - 5 hours). With respect to fire danger, this map is useful for depicting areas of very low water vapor content (orange and red colors) which can sometimes translate to very low relative humidity at the surface, especially during the daytime with convective mixing, leading to high fire danger. This map is typically updated every 15 minutes.